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Year 4

Welcome to Year 4.

Welcome to Year 4.  1

A bit of a change from our September group photo!

A bit of a change from our September group photo! 1

We've been together for two terms (only one more to go!) and we are all still smiling.

We've been together for two terms (only one more to go!) and we are all still smiling. 1

Almost at the end of the year.

Almost at the end of the year. 1
Almost at the end of the year. 2

The celebration of the Festival of Vardavar; an Armenian water festival celebrated 98 days (14 weeks) after Easter ... so we are only 5 days early.Originally a traditional festival to give thanks to the goddess of water, life love and beauty (Astghik) the festival is now part of the Christian calendar. Although the idea is to douse passing strangers with water we decided that this wasn't fair, however, we had so much fun showering each other, Hector and Mrs Sajoe although Mrs Mahony made excuses about her camera and Mrs Yeatman kept disappearing to fill more buckets (well, someone had to!). We had a lot of fun. Happy Vardavar!

A fun Science homework to consolidate understanding of food chains and eco-systems. I know the children will certainly enjoy this task! We will discuss their findings next Tuesday (18th July).

I have a super video of the class enjoying a sack race. However, I'm having a few 'up-loading' issues. So, I'll be working on this.frown

Woodworking - an old craft.

Woodworking - an old craft.  1
Woodworking - an old craft.  2
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Woodworking - an old craft.  18
Summer 2017 -  the final term in year 4.sad

The Easter egg hunt ...cracking good fun!

frown Netball fun with years 4 and 5 - see the photos on the sporting gallery page.

Crackin' Comic Cakes! We did our bit for Comic Relief and we thoroughly enjoyed the cooking, selling and eating experience ...but not necessarily in that order!

  Whose Story?     

            For more photos of the Y3/4 production see the            school 'Special Events' page. 

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And even more from Science week! Yes ... we used more balloons to investigate scientific phenomena. Toby blew up a balloon and Mrs Mahony placed it over a burning candle and we all predicted that it would burst - and it did! But then Molly and Izzie filled a balloon with cold water and, for safety reasons, Mrs Mahony held it over the burning candle.We were surprised it didn't explode and spray water over us and even more surprised that the outside of the balloon burned leaving ashy deposits. It didn't burst because the cold water prevented the heat from the flame having any effect. What we did think was very interesting was that the balloon partially filled with H2O (water) contains hydrogen ...and that this highly flammable gas had a fatal affect on the Hindenberg zeppelin in May 1937. Fascinating!

More from Science Week 2017 - Mr Mahony (a trainee teacher) helped us with our fun investigations, this time looking at the effect of mixing white wine vinegar and bicarbonate of soda. We noticed that they reacted with each other firstly bubbling and fizzing and then we were surprised how quickly the balloon grew. The gas (carbon dioxide) couldn't escape because it was trapped by the balloon. As more and more gas was made, the balloon blew up. Carbon dioxide gas kept on being produced until there was no vinegar or bicarbonate of soda left to react. As we had captured the carbon dioxide inside the balloon, we could see how much space it took up. The gas took up much more space than the vinegar and sodium bicarbonate did. We were also surprised how much more fun it was watching the long balloon grow too!

Science Week - 2017. We're linking some of our science investigations to our work on the brand new book, 'Cogheart', by Peter Bunzl. We've found out some really interesting facts about the explosion of the Hindenburg almost 80 years ago (on 6th May 1937) - the inner skin of the massive dirigible was made from the lining of over 250,000 cow intestines; the airship was so light because it was filled with hydrogen - although this gas is highly inflammable! We also discovered that it was likely to be static electricity, rather than sabotage or lightening that was the cause of the terrible explosion and so we used balloons to learn about static electricity. We did have a lot of fun blowing up balloons and rubbing against our hair or jumpers (or even the underside of a table!) to see the effects. Then we tested the efficacy of static electricity of tissue paper, paper and card. None of us were surprised at the results! We also tested the effect of pressure of a balloon (filled with carbon dioxide - our breath) as it was pushed against drawing pins. Initially, it resisted the pins and did not burst, but when the balloon was tilted, the pressure was altered and ... it BURST!

Science Week - 2017. We're linking some of our science investigations to our work on the brand new book, 'Cogheart', by Peter Bunzl. We've found out some really interesting facts about the explosion of the Hindenburg almost 80 years ago (on 6th May 1937) - the inner skin of the massive dirigible was made from the lining of over 250,000 cow intestines; the airship was so light because it was filled with hydrogen - although this gas is highly inflammable! We also discovered that it was likely to be static electricity, rather than sabotage or lightening that was the cause of the terrible explosion and so we used balloons to learn about static electricity. We did have a lot of fun blowing up balloons and rubbing against our hair or jumpers (or even the underside of a table!) to see the effects. Then we tested the efficacy of static electricity of tissue paper, paper and card. None of us were surprised at the results! We also tested the effect of pressure of a balloon (filled with carbon dioxide - our breath) as it was pushed against drawing pins. Initially, it resisted the pins and did not burst, but when the balloon was tilted, the pressure was altered and ... it BURST! 1
Science Week - 2017. We're linking some of our science investigations to our work on the brand new book, 'Cogheart', by Peter Bunzl. We've found out some really interesting facts about the explosion of the Hindenburg almost 80 years ago (on 6th May 1937) - the inner skin of the massive dirigible was made from the lining of over 250,000 cow intestines; the airship was so light because it was filled with hydrogen - although this gas is highly inflammable! We also discovered that it was likely to be static electricity, rather than sabotage or lightening that was the cause of the terrible explosion and so we used balloons to learn about static electricity. We did have a lot of fun blowing up balloons and rubbing against our hair or jumpers (or even the underside of a table!) to see the effects. Then we tested the efficacy of static electricity of tissue paper, paper and card. None of us were surprised at the results! We also tested the effect of pressure of a balloon (filled with carbon dioxide - our breath) as it was pushed against drawing pins. Initially, it resisted the pins and did not burst, but when the balloon was tilted, the pressure was altered and ... it BURST! 2
Science Week - 2017. We're linking some of our science investigations to our work on the brand new book, 'Cogheart', by Peter Bunzl. We've found out some really interesting facts about the explosion of the Hindenburg almost 80 years ago (on 6th May 1937) - the inner skin of the massive dirigible was made from the lining of over 250,000 cow intestines; the airship was so light because it was filled with hydrogen - although this gas is highly inflammable! We also discovered that it was likely to be static electricity, rather than sabotage or lightening that was the cause of the terrible explosion and so we used balloons to learn about static electricity. We did have a lot of fun blowing up balloons and rubbing against our hair or jumpers (or even the underside of a table!) to see the effects. Then we tested the efficacy of static electricity of tissue paper, paper and card. None of us were surprised at the results! We also tested the effect of pressure of a balloon (filled with carbon dioxide - our breath) as it was pushed against drawing pins. Initially, it resisted the pins and did not burst, but when the balloon was tilted, the pressure was altered and ... it BURST! 3
Science Week - 2017. We're linking some of our science investigations to our work on the brand new book, 'Cogheart', by Peter Bunzl. We've found out some really interesting facts about the explosion of the Hindenburg almost 80 years ago (on 6th May 1937) - the inner skin of the massive dirigible was made from the lining of over 250,000 cow intestines; the airship was so light because it was filled with hydrogen - although this gas is highly inflammable! We also discovered that it was likely to be static electricity, rather than sabotage or lightening that was the cause of the terrible explosion and so we used balloons to learn about static electricity. We did have a lot of fun blowing up balloons and rubbing against our hair or jumpers (or even the underside of a table!) to see the effects. Then we tested the efficacy of static electricity of tissue paper, paper and card. None of us were surprised at the results! We also tested the effect of pressure of a balloon (filled with carbon dioxide - our breath) as it was pushed against drawing pins. Initially, it resisted the pins and did not burst, but when the balloon was tilted, the pressure was altered and ... it BURST! 4
Science Week - 2017. We're linking some of our science investigations to our work on the brand new book, 'Cogheart', by Peter Bunzl. We've found out some really interesting facts about the explosion of the Hindenburg almost 80 years ago (on 6th May 1937) - the inner skin of the massive dirigible was made from the lining of over 250,000 cow intestines; the airship was so light because it was filled with hydrogen - although this gas is highly inflammable! We also discovered that it was likely to be static electricity, rather than sabotage or lightening that was the cause of the terrible explosion and so we used balloons to learn about static electricity. We did have a lot of fun blowing up balloons and rubbing against our hair or jumpers (or even the underside of a table!) to see the effects. Then we tested the efficacy of static electricity of tissue paper, paper and card. None of us were surprised at the results! We also tested the effect of pressure of a balloon (filled with carbon dioxide - our breath) as it was pushed against drawing pins. Initially, it resisted the pins and did not burst, but when the balloon was tilted, the pressure was altered and ... it BURST! 5
Science Week - 2017. We're linking some of our science investigations to our work on the brand new book, 'Cogheart', by Peter Bunzl. We've found out some really interesting facts about the explosion of the Hindenburg almost 80 years ago (on 6th May 1937) - the inner skin of the massive dirigible was made from the lining of over 250,000 cow intestines; the airship was so light because it was filled with hydrogen - although this gas is highly inflammable! We also discovered that it was likely to be static electricity, rather than sabotage or lightening that was the cause of the terrible explosion and so we used balloons to learn about static electricity. We did have a lot of fun blowing up balloons and rubbing against our hair or jumpers (or even the underside of a table!) to see the effects. Then we tested the efficacy of static electricity of tissue paper, paper and card. None of us were surprised at the results! We also tested the effect of pressure of a balloon (filled with carbon dioxide - our breath) as it was pushed against drawing pins. Initially, it resisted the pins and did not burst, but when the balloon was tilted, the pressure was altered and ... it BURST! 6
Science Week - 2017. We're linking some of our science investigations to our work on the brand new book, 'Cogheart', by Peter Bunzl. We've found out some really interesting facts about the explosion of the Hindenburg almost 80 years ago (on 6th May 1937) - the inner skin of the massive dirigible was made from the lining of over 250,000 cow intestines; the airship was so light because it was filled with hydrogen - although this gas is highly inflammable! We also discovered that it was likely to be static electricity, rather than sabotage or lightening that was the cause of the terrible explosion and so we used balloons to learn about static electricity. We did have a lot of fun blowing up balloons and rubbing against our hair or jumpers (or even the underside of a table!) to see the effects. Then we tested the efficacy of static electricity of tissue paper, paper and card. None of us were surprised at the results! We also tested the effect of pressure of a balloon (filled with carbon dioxide - our breath) as it was pushed against drawing pins. Initially, it resisted the pins and did not burst, but when the balloon was tilted, the pressure was altered and ... it BURST! 7
Science Week - 2017. We're linking some of our science investigations to our work on the brand new book, 'Cogheart', by Peter Bunzl. We've found out some really interesting facts about the explosion of the Hindenburg almost 80 years ago (on 6th May 1937) - the inner skin of the massive dirigible was made from the lining of over 250,000 cow intestines; the airship was so light because it was filled with hydrogen - although this gas is highly inflammable! We also discovered that it was likely to be static electricity, rather than sabotage or lightening that was the cause of the terrible explosion and so we used balloons to learn about static electricity. We did have a lot of fun blowing up balloons and rubbing against our hair or jumpers (or even the underside of a table!) to see the effects. Then we tested the efficacy of static electricity of tissue paper, paper and card. None of us were surprised at the results! We also tested the effect of pressure of a balloon (filled with carbon dioxide - our breath) as it was pushed against drawing pins. Initially, it resisted the pins and did not burst, but when the balloon was tilted, the pressure was altered and ... it BURST! 8
Science Week - 2017. We're linking some of our science investigations to our work on the brand new book, 'Cogheart', by Peter Bunzl. We've found out some really interesting facts about the explosion of the Hindenburg almost 80 years ago (on 6th May 1937) - the inner skin of the massive dirigible was made from the lining of over 250,000 cow intestines; the airship was so light because it was filled with hydrogen - although this gas is highly inflammable! We also discovered that it was likely to be static electricity, rather than sabotage or lightening that was the cause of the terrible explosion and so we used balloons to learn about static electricity. We did have a lot of fun blowing up balloons and rubbing against our hair or jumpers (or even the underside of a table!) to see the effects. Then we tested the efficacy of static electricity of tissue paper, paper and card. None of us were surprised at the results! We also tested the effect of pressure of a balloon (filled with carbon dioxide - our breath) as it was pushed against drawing pins. Initially, it resisted the pins and did not burst, but when the balloon was tilted, the pressure was altered and ... it BURST! 9
Science Week - 2017. We're linking some of our science investigations to our work on the brand new book, 'Cogheart', by Peter Bunzl. We've found out some really interesting facts about the explosion of the Hindenburg almost 80 years ago (on 6th May 1937) - the inner skin of the massive dirigible was made from the lining of over 250,000 cow intestines; the airship was so light because it was filled with hydrogen - although this gas is highly inflammable! We also discovered that it was likely to be static electricity, rather than sabotage or lightening that was the cause of the terrible explosion and so we used balloons to learn about static electricity. We did have a lot of fun blowing up balloons and rubbing against our hair or jumpers (or even the underside of a table!) to see the effects. Then we tested the efficacy of static electricity of tissue paper, paper and card. None of us were surprised at the results! We also tested the effect of pressure of a balloon (filled with carbon dioxide - our breath) as it was pushed against drawing pins. Initially, it resisted the pins and did not burst, but when the balloon was tilted, the pressure was altered and ... it BURST! 10
Science Week - 2017. We're linking some of our science investigations to our work on the brand new book, 'Cogheart', by Peter Bunzl. We've found out some really interesting facts about the explosion of the Hindenburg almost 80 years ago (on 6th May 1937) - the inner skin of the massive dirigible was made from the lining of over 250,000 cow intestines; the airship was so light because it was filled with hydrogen - although this gas is highly inflammable! We also discovered that it was likely to be static electricity, rather than sabotage or lightening that was the cause of the terrible explosion and so we used balloons to learn about static electricity. We did have a lot of fun blowing up balloons and rubbing against our hair or jumpers (or even the underside of a table!) to see the effects. Then we tested the efficacy of static electricity of tissue paper, paper and card. None of us were surprised at the results! We also tested the effect of pressure of a balloon (filled with carbon dioxide - our breath) as it was pushed against drawing pins. Initially, it resisted the pins and did not burst, but when the balloon was tilted, the pressure was altered and ... it BURST! 11
Science Week - 2017. We're linking some of our science investigations to our work on the brand new book, 'Cogheart', by Peter Bunzl. We've found out some really interesting facts about the explosion of the Hindenburg almost 80 years ago (on 6th May 1937) - the inner skin of the massive dirigible was made from the lining of over 250,000 cow intestines; the airship was so light because it was filled with hydrogen - although this gas is highly inflammable! We also discovered that it was likely to be static electricity, rather than sabotage or lightening that was the cause of the terrible explosion and so we used balloons to learn about static electricity. We did have a lot of fun blowing up balloons and rubbing against our hair or jumpers (or even the underside of a table!) to see the effects. Then we tested the efficacy of static electricity of tissue paper, paper and card. None of us were surprised at the results! We also tested the effect of pressure of a balloon (filled with carbon dioxide - our breath) as it was pushed against drawing pins. Initially, it resisted the pins and did not burst, but when the balloon was tilted, the pressure was altered and ... it BURST! 12
Science Week - 2017. We're linking some of our science investigations to our work on the brand new book, 'Cogheart', by Peter Bunzl. We've found out some really interesting facts about the explosion of the Hindenburg almost 80 years ago (on 6th May 1937) - the inner skin of the massive dirigible was made from the lining of over 250,000 cow intestines; the airship was so light because it was filled with hydrogen - although this gas is highly inflammable! We also discovered that it was likely to be static electricity, rather than sabotage or lightening that was the cause of the terrible explosion and so we used balloons to learn about static electricity. We did have a lot of fun blowing up balloons and rubbing against our hair or jumpers (or even the underside of a table!) to see the effects. Then we tested the efficacy of static electricity of tissue paper, paper and card. None of us were surprised at the results! We also tested the effect of pressure of a balloon (filled with carbon dioxide - our breath) as it was pushed against drawing pins. Initially, it resisted the pins and did not burst, but when the balloon was tilted, the pressure was altered and ... it BURST! 13
Science Week - 2017. We're linking some of our science investigations to our work on the brand new book, 'Cogheart', by Peter Bunzl. We've found out some really interesting facts about the explosion of the Hindenburg almost 80 years ago (on 6th May 1937) - the inner skin of the massive dirigible was made from the lining of over 250,000 cow intestines; the airship was so light because it was filled with hydrogen - although this gas is highly inflammable! We also discovered that it was likely to be static electricity, rather than sabotage or lightening that was the cause of the terrible explosion and so we used balloons to learn about static electricity. We did have a lot of fun blowing up balloons and rubbing against our hair or jumpers (or even the underside of a table!) to see the effects. Then we tested the efficacy of static electricity of tissue paper, paper and card. None of us were surprised at the results! We also tested the effect of pressure of a balloon (filled with carbon dioxide - our breath) as it was pushed against drawing pins. Initially, it resisted the pins and did not burst, but when the balloon was tilted, the pressure was altered and ... it BURST! 14
Science Week - 2017. We're linking some of our science investigations to our work on the brand new book, 'Cogheart', by Peter Bunzl. We've found out some really interesting facts about the explosion of the Hindenburg almost 80 years ago (on 6th May 1937) - the inner skin of the massive dirigible was made from the lining of over 250,000 cow intestines; the airship was so light because it was filled with hydrogen - although this gas is highly inflammable! We also discovered that it was likely to be static electricity, rather than sabotage or lightening that was the cause of the terrible explosion and so we used balloons to learn about static electricity. We did have a lot of fun blowing up balloons and rubbing against our hair or jumpers (or even the underside of a table!) to see the effects. Then we tested the efficacy of static electricity of tissue paper, paper and card. None of us were surprised at the results! We also tested the effect of pressure of a balloon (filled with carbon dioxide - our breath) as it was pushed against drawing pins. Initially, it resisted the pins and did not burst, but when the balloon was tilted, the pressure was altered and ... it BURST! 15

Warning ... balloons can give Ec-STATIC results for the latest in hair fashion! 

At last, we have completed the designs for our Land Rovers following our trip to the British Motor Museum. We're sure you'll be amazed at our imaginative and unique designs.

World Book Day

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We had a super trip to the British Motor Museum in Gaydon. We understood that the design of cars (and any motor vehicle) is a combination of 'Fashion' and 'Function' from the body to the interior. We even saw how one of the Queen's Land Rovers had been adapted to ensure her corgis could climb in easily! We used our new found knowledge to design the exterior of a Land Rover but as time was short we'll need to complete the task at school. Photos of the finished cars will appear on our class page soon. In the afternoon we thoroughly enjoyed the challenges of our 'Robotics and Coding' workshop. Using Lego, we had to build an F1 racing car, write a program on a tablet, link the tablet to the car via Bluetooth so we could race our cars to see whose car was the fastest. And then we had a further challenge - change the rear wheels for larger ones - would the increased friction increase the speed? It was a very competitive activity. We also enjoyed the opportunity to wander around this fantastic museum to look at the exhibits. Joe really was in his element - we thought we'd never get him home!

Our F1 time trials ... it was so much fun!

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We braved the bitter cold to have fun with a ball, and to ensure we didn't have too many children standing around we adapted our netball game to keep us moving. We enjoyed the fast pace of the game very much - although our counting skills went awry as we often forgot the rule of only two yellows and two reds in the D! The weather deteriorated quickly and by the end of game the snow was beginning to fall. However, it was a lot of fun but we're hoping for better weather next term!

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Music ... or is it science? Well, it's both! We used glockenspiels (a link with our book 'Clockwork', which is set in Glockenheim) and different 'beaters' to investigate sound, vibration and pitch. We even used rice grains to see the effect of the invisible sound waves. We realised that depending on the intensity of force striking the metal bar it really did affect the waves - from being 'explosive' to being 'like little bugs wriggling'. We also tested this on drums too and this confirmed what we had observed on the glockenspiel bars. In music Mrs Mahony only let us use 5 notes to compose short tunes - using C, D, E, G and A (the C major pentatonic scale) but we managed it.

Cogs, cassettes and chains! We have been using our skills of observation to draw the items on display. It was not as easy as you'd think (especially as Mrs Mahony has banned rubbers!) but we all tried our very best. Our next job was to make a frame and then find a part of our original drawing to enlarge. The designs will form the basis of the lino printing we will be doing after half term and also to make an interesting background for our clocks - more news soon. A big 'Thank you' to Tom, Mrs Yeatman's son, for letting us borrow some of his bicycle parts.

Flamenco workshop. We really enjoyed learning some intrinsic dance moves of Flamenco - syncopated clapping and stamping, and twirling our hands and our bodies to the rhythm of Ramon's guitar. Izzie, Harriett and Emily really stepped into character wearing their brightly coloured Flamenco dresses and they certainly found it easier to swish and sashay across the dance floor. We hope you enjoyed the display band if you weren't able to be there then do look at the display photos on the 'Special Events' page of the website.

Check out our fancy Flamenco footwork ... it's not as easy as you'd think!

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Happy New Year to you all! New challenges await us all in Y4.and it will be both exciting and interesting ... Tick, tock, tick, tock … The passing of time and how we interact with it will provide the backdrop to this term’s studies in year 4. Music, science, art and maths provide us with superb opportunities to learn from some real 'Clever Clogs'!

Dates for your diary

 

17th January - Flamenco KS2 visit.

3rd February – Midyear reports sent to parents

9th February – KPSA Film night

13th- 17th February – Half term

27th Feb – 10th March – Fairtrade fortnight

1st March – Y4 Open door (3:00-3:30)

7th March - U11 Boys Hockey

15th March - Year 3&4 Production (6:00)

16th March - Year 3&4 Production (2:00)

4th April – KPSA Easter Bingo

5th April - Parents’ evening (3:20-6:30)

6th April - Parents’ evening (3:20-6:00)

7th April – School closes for Easter holidays (2:00)

Anti-bullying week 2016 - we looked at five different picture books and tried to identify what the anti-bullying message could be. We made posters in the style of some of the books and we also wrote our own books highlighting the hidden messages too - it was a lot of fun and we were really pleased with our efforts. It also made our English lessons fun too, because we also looked at the structure of the sentences and the vocabulary used by the authors to engage the reader. We even managed to get some maths out of the project too - graphing 'Y4s Favourite Book' in a pie and bar chart. The runaway winner was Two Can Toucan by David McKee. At the end of the week we put our work on display for parents to look at - this is our very colourful display. A big' thank you' to Delilah and Jack for having the confidence to 'man' the table and explain what we had done.

Anti-bullying week 2016 - we looked at five different picture books and tried to identify what the anti-bullying message could be. We made posters in the style of some of the books and we also wrote our own books highlighting the hidden messages too - it was a lot of fun and we were really pleased with our efforts. It also made our English lessons fun too, because we also looked at the structure of the sentences and the vocabulary used by the authors to engage the reader. We even managed to get some maths out of the project too - graphing 'Y4s Favourite Book' in a pie and bar chart. The runaway winner was Two Can Toucan by David McKee. At the end of the week we put our work on display for parents to look at - this is our very colourful display. A big' thank you' to  Delilah and Jack for having the confidence to 'man' the table and explain what we had done. 1

We loved the wet and muddy ramble we went on this morning (14/11/16) to raise money for Children in Need. But don't forget your Sponsor forms - we want to see if we can improve the total raised last year! You'll have to wait for a few more days to see all the other photos though, which I'm sure will be posted on the 'Special Events' page of the website soon.

We loved the wet and muddy ramble we went on this morning (14/11/16) to raise money for Children in Need. But don't forget your Sponsor forms - we want to see if we can improve the total raised last year! You'll have to wait for a few more days to see all the other photos though, which I'm sure will be posted on the 'Special Events' page of the website soon. 1

What a creative bunch we have in year 4! Using armfuls of fallen leaves the children decided to create Mount Vesuvius erupting. They made an enormous mound, hollowed out the centre to form the crater and then decorated the structure with strips of shiny paper and ribbons to suggest running lava and explosive fireworks. They were absolutely thrilled with the effect of their natural art.

Children in Need 2016. The great Spot Hunt - we decorated our spots using the Pointillist method, in the style of Pudsey, a mathematically symmetrical pattern or the Gorgon (from our topic work). Not only did we enjoy the art, but we loved the hunt too ...thank you, Miss Woskett.

Roman cooking ... What a day! We chopped, sliced, crushed, mixed, stirred and cooked a feast to celebrate the magnificent achievements of the victors of power and strength on the field. Toby N, 'Victor ludorum of the howler', threw an astonishing 99 feet, and Aiden, 'Victor ludorum of the shot', threw his shot an astounding 37 feet! We were fed on an authentic Roman menu including oregano flavoured flatbreads, Moretum (garlic cheese), Isicia Omentata (Roman beef burgers) followed by 'placenta'! Not for the faint-hearted, perhaps? Well, this was a sweet Roman honey cake - absolutely delicious drizzled with extra honey and topped with toasted pine nuts. We thoroughly enjoyed the Roman dining experience, although the Romans probably had more comfort - lying on couches (not the floor), but the feast was simply amazing. We were entertained by musicians (Emily, Isabella and Joe) playing Roman inspired tunes and were treated to a Roman joke, courtesy of Eva-May. We all missed Woody (our class Virgil) this afternoon, though. We were all waiting in anticipation for the next instalment of his Roman epic - so will just have to wait a little longer. It was a superb day and we had enormous fun. Salutate!

Another earthquake strikes!

This morning another powerful earthquake rattle Italy! It was a massive 6.6 magnitude and, so far, no deaths have been reported.

 

 

 

 

Breaking News (26/10/16)...

 

An earthquake has hit Italy again! This time it has affected the centre of Rome.Even the Colosseum has been rocked. See what you can find out for when we return to school on Monday, 31st October.

Did you see it?

                                            

I didn't know how how heavy they could get! But, the downside is that eat some of our local species of birds (and eggs) and even bats! 

Perhaps the Romans knew something about the dormouse that we're only beginning to find out ...what do you think?

 

 

Check out AUTUMN WATCH on BBC2

on Tuesday 25th October. 

There's news on edible dormice! 

A 'must' for the Romans amongst us!

October Half Term Homework  Knowing how much you all enjoy your art, I am sure that  you will really enjoy this activity.You will need to draw, sketch,paint, colour or photograph (and name) any Roman inspired architecture you see whilst on holiday.  You won't even need to travel far either ... Chipping Norton has Roman inspired pillars outside the Town Hall as do many towns, cities and villages nearby. I'm sure that some people will say that the architecture is based on Greek designs, but we know that the Romans only copied the very best ideas!

Finally, Do take pride in your work and show me the very best that you can do.                                                                                  

Other things to do over the break: read every day, continue to practise your times tables and spellings and be ready for 'Round the World' and 'Round the Word' on Monday 31st October.

We've been painting Roman characters for our display. We've also been working in small groups to sculpt a papier mache Gorgon (also known as Medusa) based on the Gorgon found at the Roman Baths. Keep an eye out to see how our project progresses.

Our visit to the Roman Baths in Bath, in October 2016, was excellent. We were amazed at the wealth of original Roman artefacts and that we also had the opportunity to handle them. What we found even more amazing was that the Romans were so ahead of their time and that in some respects we've not progressed much further in 2000 years. We had a lot of fun and it was a terrific day out!

Roman Research Project

Please do read the information about the research project your children will need to complete over the course of the next three weeks. This will be very useful in their Science (learning about teeth and digestion, particularly) but also their DT.

Encourage them to do a little research at a time, rather than leaving all the work until the very last minute - a good habit that will support them into secondary school and beyond!

Thank you.

Roman Research - information for children

Our trip to The Roman Baths in Bath ... what an amazing day! So much so that nearly 400 photos were taken of the visit. So here is just a taster of what you will see in a few days after a marathon sorting job. Just a little 'extra' - one of the attendants at the baths remarked "I haven't seen such a well behaved group of young children in a very long time!" So please parents, say a thoroughly deserved 'thank you' to your children. They were a real pleasure to be with.

Year 4 and the Dreamflight Charity ... We were asked by Isabella's parents to produce 'Disney Pictures' to decorate the cabin area of the BA aircraft where the children (suffering a serious illness or disability) will shortly travel to Florida to enjoy the holiday of a lifetime. As the website of Dreamflight comments ' it is a UK charity that changes young lives through taking children with a serious illness or disability, without their parents, on the holiday of a lifetime to Orlando, Florida. Established in 1987 and operating annually since, Dreamflight believes that fun and joy are just as important as medical research and equipment - especially for children who perhaps can't wait long enough for the breakthrough they need or whose illnesses and treatments have brought pain, distress and disruption to their lives. ' In year 4 we are SO proud of our paintings and we hope that the children will enjoy looking at them

Roman Tours at Kingham Primary - At last, I have trawled through almost 300 photos taken to give a real flavour of the fun and excitement of the day. You'll see just how much fun the children had by the expressions on their faces. Do enjoy the slideshow.

What a fantastic day!Our visit from Roman Tours was action packed with excitement and a lot of fun and laughter. With over 250 photos taken (!!) these are just a taste of what you will see very soon on our class page. An editing marathon awaits Mrs Mahony!

We love playing hockey in year 4. These are our practise teams, and because we've been learning about poetic devices in English some of us have chosen alliterative names!

We love playing hockey in year 4. These are our practise teams, and because we've been learning about poetic devices in English some of us have chosen alliterative names!  1 Lightening Bolts
We love playing hockey in year 4. These are our practise teams, and because we've been learning about poetic devices in English some of us have chosen alliterative names!  2 Rapid Romans
We love playing hockey in year 4. These are our practise teams, and because we've been learning about poetic devices in English some of us have chosen alliterative names!  3 Speedy Spiders
We love playing hockey in year 4. These are our practise teams, and because we've been learning about poetic devices in English some of us have chosen alliterative names!  4 Hockey Masters
We love playing hockey in year 4. These are our practise teams, and because we've been learning about poetic devices in English some of us have chosen alliterative names!  5 Roman Racers
We love playing hockey in year 4. These are our practise teams, and because we've been learning about poetic devices in English some of us have chosen alliterative names!  6 Super Shooters
We love playing hockey in year 4. These are our practise teams, and because we've been learning about poetic devices in English some of us have chosen alliterative names!  7 Hockey Heroes
We love playing hockey in year 4. These are our practise teams, and because we've been learning about poetic devices in English some of us have chosen alliterative names!  8 Roman Eagles

Our Class Reader ...

We begin this rear reading the ripping yarn 'Romans on the Rampage' by Jeremy Strong. It is an hilariously exciting tale about the trials and tribulations of living in Ancient Rome. And the narrator? Well, being the ornithological class that Year 4 is ... it's a very clever and well educated bird! So please do buy (or borrow) a copy of the book as we will be doing a a variety of activities in class (and for homework) based on it. I know your children will love it ...I did, and so did my children!

Do look at the information for what we are studying this term.


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